Habitat for Humanity:The Animal Edition Update.

Some of our most fearless and experienced volunteers gathered Monday night, as the sun was setting, to round up a large colony of feral cats in Levittown. 

The area is sandwiched between a few apartment complexes and a residential area. 

But this paticular area isn’t well maintained.


These cats are loved by some but hated by many. They are known to fight and occasionally get into trash cans. But these are all simple fixes and that’s why we’re here.

8 traps were set up and placed around the area. Some friendly and extra hungry cats did the work for us by walking directly into carriers.
“Which way to the clinic!?”

After a short time 4 cats of various ages were caught. 

But we had a lot more to go, so they brought in the big guns.
They came in herds. 

“Pass me the mashed potatoes.”

After all the traps were loaded with extra delicious fried chicken 6 more cats and kittens were trapped. 

All cats were safely transported in air conditioned vehicles back to the clinic where they were put into large cages with all the amenities.

On Tuesday all cats were given a thorough evaluation, then spayed or neutered and vaccinated. 

After these beautiful creatures are recovered they will be released back into the area they were found. This is extremely important because stray and feral cats can’t survive in every environment. They are smart and gather in specific areas that will provide them with food and water. 

The colony will be monitored closely over the next few weeks. And more cats will be trapped if possible. 

Dedicated Volunteers from The Bridge Clinuc have pledged to set up shelters for the colony to help keep them warm over the long winter.  The Bridge Clinic will remain in contact with residents in the area who have agreed to monitor and feed the colony.  Look for more updates soon and if you have not signed our petition to help stop dumped cats click the link below now!!!

Animal Lives Matter

How we make a difference

How we make a difference

So here you are asking yourself what’s all the fuss we keep hearing The Bridge Clinic and Rescue Purrfect talk about Habitat for Humanity and TNR. Must be some crazy Cat lady thing right? Well it is.. But hear us out  
 While we wish we could rescue every animal off the streets so they didn’t have to suffer through cold winters or heatwaves, thunderstorms or tornados, (yes tornados! Bensalem has around one per year and while we are hunkered down in our basements shielded from the storm there are cats and kittens of every age and size braving the elements), but the reality is that we can’t. 

A lot of the animals we come across have either lost their trust in humans over a period of time or have never been in contact with a good one, so forcing them to spend their days in a cage is not only cruel, but it’s impossible.

While some places believe its ok to round these animals up and euthanize them so they stop breeding and causing problems; this has been proven not to work. Read more about that here.

We like to take a kinder approach and instead of explaining how we do it we want to really show you how this all works.

It is common knowledge around Bensalem  that there are areas littered with cats. The Bridge Clinic and Rescue Purrfect (TBCRP) along with some very devoted  volunteers have been participating in fundraisers and applying for grants in order to help with several really crowded areas. 

In one particular location, concerned and loving community members have taken it upon themselves to organize and provide food, water and shelter on a daily basis, however they are not financial able to provide medical treatment such as vaccinations, spay/neuter or treatment for illnesses or injuries that are inevitable, so they reached out to The Bridge Clinic and Rescue Purrfect. 

Upon arrival and after some research, it was discovered that there were 13 cats and kittens that “colonized” the area with a few stragglers that come and go as they please. Another rescue had entered the area in the past and helped to fix 3 of the cats but that still left a 5 adults and 5 kittens and with it being summer those numbers could quickly multiply.


One of the most urgent reasons the community contacted The Bridge Clinic and Rescue Purrfect (TBCRP) was because of a very pregnant mommy cat. Volunteers tried several times at all times of the day and night to retrieve the mom cat, Angie, as she is so lovingly referred to, before she gave birth, but they were unable. As a result 3 new little babies were born in a less than safe environment. 

TBCRP volunteers were distraught after finding out the Angie wasn’t tending to the babies so, they were taken in at only 2 days old and promptly began bottle feeding. Sadly only one kitten survived and is still being showered with love in their foster failure’s home.

Within 2 months of losing her first litter Angie was still on the loose and breeding conditions were just right. The Community feeders noticed her belly beginning to grow so volunteers spent every available minute trapping. 

One night 2 very determined volunteers set out to trap the newly pregnant Angie. Redbulls in hand they tried every trick in the book. Fortunately, they were able to trap 2 adults, Snotty, who had some serious infections causing his whole face to leak, thus his name, and Nippy, a beautiful black and white mom cat who had obviously done her share of nursing. 

Along with the two adults, two kittens were also pulled that night.  

Unfortunately, Angie had evaded trappers again. After a few more attempts, the rest of the cats were caught and taken to the clinic to be treated and spayed or neutered. All the kittens were put up for adoption and 2 are still currently available. 

And here’s the guy responsible for all those kittens. Big Daddy. 

  Ain’t no shame in his game.

Angie, still on the run, has recently given birth to another litter of kittens and volunteers are certain this next trapping adventure should do the trick. 

So instead of a colony of 20 who will brave the conditions all winter long there are only 8. Barring any more abandoned animals this colony will live out their days cared for and out of harms way. 

If you would like to be involved in anyway please contact us immediately. We are gearing up for a very cold winter and have a few areas that really need our help. Email us at bevvarallo@thebridgeclinic.org 


Sign our petition here

Microchipping Saves Lives

We’ve all seen those stories, the flyers on the phone poles, the search parties in the dead of winter, even the billboards on I-95: the beloved and missing family pet. 

All of these desperate attempts to reunite with a furry friend. Pets bring so much joy into our lives and they leave a lasting mark on our hearts. That’s what makes seeing homeless, malnourished cats and dogs living outside so sad: knowing they are probably missing from someone’s family or were abandoned for one reason or another to fend for themselves. There are so many reasons why we love animals and for all of those reasons it is urgent that we begin microchipping all of our pets; indoor and out.

There are currently 66,000 residents in Bensalem, Pa with an estimated amount of 96,000 pets. Somewhere around 3% of those pets are reported lost or stolen every year. Currently, according to Santa Cruz County Animal Shelter, statics say only 1.8% of unmicrochipped cats and 21.9% of dogs are returned to their homes. However, cats who were microchipped were returned 38.5% of the time and dogs 52.2% !!! That’s huge! 

Not only is that great news for pets and their families, but a huge help to the community as well.It is very costly for animal control to trap these animals and even more costly to house them until they can be reunited or euthanized which is the normal practice in most of Bensalem’s local shelters.

If that hasn’t convinced you to run out to your local low cost clinic and get your furry friend chipped here’s a little more info on the procedure according to Santa Cruz:

    “A microchip, an electronic chip enclosed in a glass cylinder, is injected under the skin using a hypodermic needle. It is activated by a scanner, which displays a number. This unique number is used to identify the animal. The number links to owner contact information in a registry (accessible 24/7) that allows shelters, clinics, veterinarians, and humane organizations to contact the owner of a lost pet is found.” All of this: peace of mind, permanent identification, and hope for the low low cost of $16 at most low cost clinics.

Sadly, there are still a good amount of animals who are currently missing and even more who have been dumped purposely and left to survive in a world they know nothing about. Bensalem’s neighborhoods, apartment complexes, and businesses all have little areas of stray cats who have gathered together and formed colonies near shelter and food sources such as dumpsters or the woods in efforts to stay alive. 

Microchipping all animals will decrease the likelihood that someone will dump their animal because all chips will be registered into a national database. If a law or ordinance can be put in place to ensure that all pets are microchipped police would then be allowed to issue citations and fines for dumped or mistreated animals. So, instead of costing the community money by housing strays in a shelter and eventually euthanizing them if their owner isn’t located at the tax payers expense, the township could see an increase in revenues which means this whole microchipping thing could pay for itself tenfold!

While we can do our best as a community in combination with local animal rescues to trap, spay and neuter, and chip these cats, 

the real change will need to come from people and places such as vets, rescues, feral colony care takers, clinics, hospitals, housing management and animal breeders. But the only way to ensure this is normal practice is to pass an ordinance to ensure all pets are microchipped before they are adopted and the only way to get that done is to get the word out first! Liking, sharing and commenting on this page will help to get the attention we need to effect this change. Let’s band together as a community and provide the best possible care for our pets and be the voice for those who aren’t being spoken for! 


Habitat for Humanity: The Animal Edition

Currently, there are approximately 30 to 40 feral cats living outside of an apartment complex in Levittown. 

A problem like this can easily turn into hundreds of homeless, hungry cats  spreading disease and breeding if nothing is done about it. 

“Trap Neuter Release Plus” is the best proven way to humanely get the stray population under control. 

For this project we will need volunteers of every skill set. From building shelters to trapping to transporting animals to facilities to holding cats until they recover to fostering kittens along side our already established TNR experts. If this is something you would be interested in helping with please contact us immediately. Bevvarallo@thebridgeclinic.org